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Breeds 101

Basset Fauve de Bretagne

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The breed was produced by crossing the Griffon Fauve de Bretagne with short-legged hounds from the Vendee region in France.

Basset Fauve de Bretagne was also close to extinction after the Second World War, and the breed was recreated using the remaining examples of the breed and crossing in Petit Basset Vendeen and Dachshunds; The French club denies this.

The breed is still rarely seen outside France, except in Great Britain, where it has endeared itself to many breeders.

This dog is one of the smallest French hounds with a typical basset shape, a long body and short legs.

The Basset Fauve de Bretagne has neither the smooth coat of the Basset Hound nor the rough, wiry coat of the Griffon Vendeen, but rather a course, hard coat.

Tenacious and durable, it both scents and flushes game, and is most at home working difficult terrain.

This basset hunted in packs of four; when it works today it is more likely to hunt singly or with a partner.

The Basset Fauve de Bretagne is lively breed, difficult to obedience train than the related Griffon Fauve.

It makes a fine companion; This dog is unhappy when confined and thrives on physical activity.

Size:

Medium: 12 to 15 inches; 25 to 35 pounds.

Colour:

Various shades of fawn and red-wheaten. Some may have a little white on the chest.

Temperament:

Sweet, friendly, lively, sensitive and devoted; an excellent companion dog; it is mid but not timid; very affectionate with its owner; good with children. It can be stubborn. They have a deep musical bark. With proper training, they are obedient.

Energy level:

Medium.

Best owner:

Confident and consistent owner who displays natural authority over the dog.

Needs:

A plenty of exercise, including a long daily walk to keep the dog mentally stable; they will run for hours in play; when they pick up a scent they may not even hear you calling them back; regularly brushing; bathe only when necessary. Trim around the ears and eyes with blunt-nosed scissors; the whole coat should be trimmed every four months and stripped twice a year.

Life expectancy:

11 to 14 years.